Class steps back in time

Leadership Hancock County

Christy Harpold examines an exhibit of World War I items in the museum at the Chapel in the Park.

Beulah Driffel isn’t a well-known figure in Hancock County history. But the story of her short life adds a lot to understanding what life was like in Hancock County in the early years of the 20th century.

The Class of 2017-18 heard the tragic story of Beulah’s life and times as part of its tour of historic sites for History Day on Oct. 4. The class visited several key sites throughout the day as part of its study of important people, places and things on the county time line.

The story of Beulah was particularly poignant. An exhibit about her is a cornerstone of the collection maintained by the Hancock County Historical Society in the basement museum at the Chapel in the Park in Riley Park in Greenfield.

According to Brigette Jones of the historical society, who led a tour of the museum for the class, Beulah was a 6-year-old who contracted diphtheria, a highly contagious illness that often was fatal in her times, the 1920s. The exhibit features items that turned up decades later in a box belonging to the child, including crayons and toys she enjoyed during her short life. The exhibit also focuses on the isolation victims of the infection suffered in that era.

The exhibit was a small window into what life was like in the county nearly 100 years ago. The day was filled with similar revelations in the class’s travels. Other highlights included:

A survey of historic structures along U.S. 40, also known as the National Road. The route was the first national highway, and historian Rosalie Richardson, with the assistance of day chair Jeff Butts, took the class of a visual tour of historic buildings along the road. Many of them have fallen into disrepair and cannot be saved, Richardson told the class, which makes this photographic record all the more important.

Leadership Hancock County

Helen Roney of Tuttle Orchards leads the class on a tour of the family farm. Tuttle’s grows more than 30 varieties of apples.

A  visit to Tuttle Orchards, one of the oldest — and most well-known — family farms in the county. Helen Roney and her daughter, Ruth Ann Roney, who are principals in the farm’s operations, took the class on a tour of the farm, which began modestly a century ago and has grown into a large regional attraction on the agritourism circuit. Class members had the chance to shop in the farm’s store for apples and cider before leaving.

A visit to the Riley Home and Museum in Greenfield, which is a staple of any historical tour of the county. Docents Frieda Pettijohn and Phyllis Arthur took the class on a delightful trip into the life and times of James Whitcomb Riley and his family in the mid-19th century.

Leadership Hancock County

Rosalie Richardson leads a tour of the Hancock County Courthouse.

A tour of the Hancock County Courthouse, led by Rosalie Richardson, that wound up in the majestic century-old chambers of Hancock Circuit Court. Judge Terry Snow of Hancock County Superior Court 1, who had wrapped up his day on the bench, joined the class for a discussion about the courts and their historical origins.

The class traveled throughout the day via motorcoach. County historian Joe Skvarenina rode with the class and provided rolling commentary about sites the group passed along the way.

 

Lineup set for History Day

Docent Frieda Pettijohn leads a tour of the Riley Home for the 2016-17 Leadership Hancock County Class. The class of 2017-18 also will visit the boyhood home of the Hoosier Poet for History Day.

Docent Frieda Pettijohn leads a tour of the Riley Home for the 2016-17 Leadership Hancock County Class. The class of 2017-18 also will visit the boyhood home of the Hoosier Poet for History Day.

Hancock County’s top historians will lead the Class of 2017-18 on a tour through the county’s history during its class day on Wednesday, Oct. 4.

History Day is the first class day following the two-day team-building retreat, which was Sept. 14-15. Its purpose is to provide an overview of the county’s history. The class covers some well-known topics but also explores some more obscure ones.

Leading those discussions will be three historians who are considered the most knowledgeable experts in the county on the area’s history:

History Day speakers Rosalie Richardson (left), Brigette Cook Jones and Joe Skvarenina

History Day speakers Rosalie Richardson (left), Brigette Cook Jones and Joe Skvarenina

Rosalie Richardson, a former member of the Hancock County Council who has studied the county’s history for decades. She will guide the class through a discussion about the National Road and will lead a tour of the Hancock County Courthouse.

Brigette Cook Jones, the director of county tourism, who has long been active in the Hancock County Historical Society. She will lead a tour of the Old Log Jail Museum and the Chapel in the Park. The two museums, located in Riley Park, house hundreds of artifacts from the county’s early history.

Joe Skvarenina, the county historian, who has written more than a dozen books on county history. (Copies of one of them, “Also Great,” an examination of famous and near-famous people from Hancock County, will be given to class members.) Joe will ride with the class during its tour of sites and will provide rolling commentary on points of interest along the way.

Here is a complete itinerary of History Day:

2017 History Day Schedule

Getting to know you: Class bonds during 2-day retreat

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Staci Starcher interviews Alex Bush as part of the introductory exercise on Day 1 of the retreat.

Maria Bond (left) and Adam Wilhelm listen to Bobby Campbell, past president and member of the LHC board.

Maria Bond (left) and Adam Wilhelm listen to Bobby Campbell, past president and member of the LHC board.

The Class of 2017-18 got off to a strong start during its retreat, getting insights about their management styles, studying leadership challenges and engaging in fun — if a bit curious — exercises.

From the first moments of the retreat, which was held Sept. 14-15 at the Hancock County Public Library, the focus was on making new connections. Board members Donnie Munden, Justine Jones, Bobby Campbell and Brad Burkhart offered insights on what the class can expect and tips on getting the most out of their experience.

Then, the class members broke up into groups of two to interview and then introduce each other to the rest of the class. After an in-depth presentation on the class members’ leadership styles using the DiSC assessment, the class spent the rest of Day 1 on their Scavenger Hunt, a longtime fixture of LHC that pits groups of four class members against each other as they travel throughout the county looking for clues and gathering materials listed on a manifest. Class members were encouraged to post pictures on social media along the way. (You can view some of those photos as part of the slide show at the top of the page.)

The class ended the first day of the retreat with a dinner at Griggsby’s Station in downtown Greenfield.

The second day featured thoughtful presentations from Ed Freije, appearing for the 23rd time before a Leadership class; and Barb Roark, assistant director of the Hancock County Public Library.

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Ed Freije, retired principal at New Palestine High School, used his years as a school administrator to present a scenario on consensus building: How to build agreement on school expansion.

Freije’s workshop focused on consensus building, and he walked the class through a scenario as he introduced tools they can use to forge consensus on contentious issues.

Roark talked about problem solving, using past class projects as object lessons to guide the class through discussion of techniques to solve problems.

A common thread running through both Day 2 presentations is that hard decisions should not be made in a vaccum: Indeed, the more voices that are heard in an organization, the more solid the decisions.

…And what’s with those odd exercises?

Adam Wilhelm (partially obscured at left), George Plisinski, Tracy Sweet and Diana Trautmann put the finishing -- and futile, it turns out -- touches on their spaghetti tower.

Adam Wilhelm (partially obscured at left), George Plisinski, Tracy Sweet and Diana Trautmann put the finishing — and futile, it turns out — touches on their spaghetti tower.

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Stephanie Wilson (left) and Angela Flench gingerly step back from their finished tower, which stayed upright long enough to win the exercise.

Jesse Keljo and Cody Flood, who work as day chairs for the Leadership Hancock County team-building retreat, have seen those looks before: befuddlement, amusement and, for some, perhaps, a little worry.

Jesse and Cody were facilitators for two important team-building exercises for the retreat. Both involved taking risks and depending on others for success. Which, when you think about it, is the very definition of successful teamwork.

The setup for Jesse’s exercise was this: Six teams of four class members were given four items: a length of string, several strands of uncooked spaghetti, some masking tape and a marshmallow. The assignment: build a free-standing tower of spaghetti with the marshmallow sitting on top. The teams could use the string for guy wire or to construct struts made of spaghetti. Same with the tape. But the tower had to be capable of standing by itself by the time the clock expired.

Jason Hua, Stephanie Wilson and Angela Flench dove right in to the challenge, but first, they discussed the problem as they tentatively worked to engineer a structure that would stand. Not all the teams did that, Jesse would note at the end of the exercise: Some chaotically started taping spaghetti strands together, and their members didn’t always communicate effectively. The result was that some team members stayed on the sidelines and didn’t offer much help, or that team members worked against each other.

Sometimes, it was both.

Jesse noted after the exercise the importance of overcoming the fear of failure. It’s OK to try things that don’t work; the key is knowing when to move on to the next idea.

Cody’s exercise was even more vexing. Unfolding a large tarp — gray on one side and blue of the other — he invited all 24 class members to stand on it. It was a tight fit, and for those around the perimeter, one tiny step backward would put them off the tarp and foul the whole exercise. The goal: While standing on the tarp, the team had to flip the gray side to blue. No one could step off it. And to make it even more challenging, half of the class couldn’t speak, and the other half couldn’t touch the tarp with their hands.

As one group articulated strategy, the other group tugged on corners of the tarp, slowly repositioning each person. Twice they had to start over when someone stepped off the tarp. But on the third try, everyone was zeroed in on the task. One by one, tiptoe by tiptoe, the class members made it onto part of an expanding blue surface. When the last person stepped from gray to blue and the final corner of the tarp was turned, the group erupted in cheers.

The class certainly learned teamwork, even as they violated each other’s personal space and risked their colleagues’ ire by absent-mindedly stepping off. One group with which Cody was associated needed a second day to complete the exercise. Fortunately, the Class of 2017-18 needed only about 40 minutes.

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Class members contemplate the uncomfortably small perimeter of the tarp.

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Angela Flench tugs on a section of the tarp as classmates toe the edges trying to move from one section to another.

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Greg Woods, Jason Hua and Courtney Miller realize they have to stick together — literally, it turns out — to compete the exercise.

DiSC assessment: A roadmap to your management style

The DiSC assessment measures a person's traits according to Dominance, Influence, Steadiness and Conscientiousness.

The DiSC assessment measures a person’s traits according to Dominance, Influence, Steadiness and Conscientiousness.

One of the highlights of the two-day Leadership Hancock County retreat, which begins Sept. 14, is the DiSC profile discussion. DiSC is a well-known system of analyzing a person’s personality and leadership style. Organizations use DiSC to gain insights into their team members’ strengths. At the team-building retreat, the Class of 2017-18 will use the assessment as a tool in identifying their own key attributes.

The students recently answered a series of questions in an online survey. DiSC plugs those answers into a matrix of characterizations to determine where the person sits on DiSC spectrum: Dominance, Influence, Steadiness and Conscientiousness. They will receive their assessments during a seminar on Sept. 14. The LHC project was supervised by Pam Kinslow, a talent management director at Community Health Network. Chad Chalos, a Community Health consultant, will present the results during the seminar.

Chad’s presentation will focus on the insights behind the results. For example, what does it mean to be a “high D”? Through the presentation, students will learn how team members’ varied strengths can be used to achieve success. Every successful organization features strong performers of all four types, and such diversity of style makes for a vibrant workplace.

The DiSC assessment has been a cornerstone of the Leadership Hancock County retreat since its founding in 1996.

Meet our scholarship winners

 

Stephanie Haines (left) and Renee Oldham, winners of Leadership Hancock County scholarships for 2017-18.

Stephanie Haines (left) and Renee Oldham, winners of Leadership Hancock County scholarships for 2017-18.

Renee Oldham already has put down some new roots. Now, she’s looking forward to growing into her new leadership role in Hancock County.

A longtime resident of Wayne County, Renee gave back to her community in a variety of positions over the years. When she and her husband moved to McCordsville a year ago to be closer to their children, it was only a matter of time before she found some similar opportunities. She reached out to town manager Tonya Galbraith. She volunteered to help her homeowners association. And she was hired as executive director of the Mt. Vernon Education Foundation.

Renee, a member of the Leadership Hancock County Class of 2017-18, was selected by the LHC board of directors to receive the annual Nancy King Scholarship, which helps underwrite a deserving enrollee’s tuition for the program. The scholarship was established by one of the program’s founders.

The King Scholarship was one of two scholarships awarded for members of the new class, whose studies begin with a two-day retreat starting on Sept. 14. Stephanie Haines, a barista and columnist for the Daily Reporter, received a donor scholarship underwritten by Hancock Regional Hospital. Stephanie was runner-up in the board’s King Scholarship voting.

In awarding the King Scholarship, the board noted Renee’s initiative to help make a difference in Hancock County. Leadership Hancock County seeks to identify emerging leaders, and Renee certainly fit that profile in the board’s view.

“As a new resident, I want to become more involved with my new community, learning new perspectives, the history, challenges and opportunities for our county, how it functions and developing new connections and learning new skills,” she wrote in an essay. “I believe participating in Leadership Hancock County would allow me the opportunity to achieve those objectives enabling me to give back thru projects and or organizations. It would give me a better understanding on where our county has been and where it is going.”

Stephanie, who lived in Bloomington for a number of years, recently moved back to Greenfield, where her family has longtime roots. She works at Litterally Divine Chocolates in Indianapolis. She already is starting to get involved in the community — she plans to be involved with the Riley Festival in October — and looks at Leadership Hancock County as an essential resource to learning about her community and connecting with stakeholders.

“I can’t get those things on my own,” she wrote in her essay. “I feel there’s no way this class couldn’t help me, as there is so much I need to learn how to do: inspire, lead by example, fulfill commitments, communicate interpersonally, and the practical side of how to make things happen.”

Renee, Stephanie and their 22 classmates will learn about the importance of team-building during their September retreat, which will be held in the GBC Community Room at the Hancock County Public Library. Topics will include consensus-building and problem solving. Class members also will study their personal leadership styles via the DiSC profile system. An expert will present the results of class members’ questionnaires to them on the first day of the retreat, Sept. 14.

 

 

 

Roster set for Class of 2017-18

Twenty-four emerging leaders will start their studies on Sept. 14-15 at the team-building retreat. The class features people from a wide variety of backgrounds. If you know anyone on this list, congratulate them for being part of the Class of 2017-18!

Maria Bond, director of community relations, Mt. Vernon Community School Corporation

Alex Bush, marketing manager, Medicap Pharmacy

Chris Carter, graphic designer, Hancock Health

Cara Fields, digital compliance manager, Elanco Animal Health

Angela Flench, finance director, Indiana Department of Transportation, Greenfield district

Stephanie Haines, barista, Litterally Divine Chocolates and columnist for the Daily Reporter

Christy Harpold, social worker, Greenfield-Central Community School Corporation

Jason Hua, dental director, Jane Pauley Community Health Center

Kelly Leddy, client service manager, MainSource Bank

Jena Mattix, children’s librarian, Hancock County Public Library

Courtney Miller, patient outreach coordinator, Jane Pauley Community Health Center

Renee Oldham, executive director, Mt. Vernon Education Foundation

Diane Petry, Life Choices Care Center

George Plisinski, telecom operations manager, NineStar Connect

Nick Riedman, I.T. director, city of Greenfield

Staci Starcher, utility department supervisor, town of McCordsville

Tracy Sweet, director of business operations, IU Health

Linda Thakrar, technical services manager, Hancock County Public Library

Diana Trautmann, marketing brand manager, Elanco Animal Health

Jason Wells, RN education, Hancock Regional Hospital

Adam Wilhelm, nursing administration/clinical education department supervisor

Stephanie Wilson, strategic administrative support, Hancock Physician Network

Stacey Wixson, trust officer, Greenfield Banking Co.

Gregory Woods, vice president, commercial loan officer, Greenfield Banking Co.

LHC board welcomes new members

New board members are (from left) Dede Allender, Jennifer Frye, Debbie Grass, Summer Grinstead and Nicole Mann.

The Leadership Hancock County Board of Directors has five new members. All of them are 2017 graduates of the Leadership.

The new board members are:

Dede Allender, who works for CGS Services. Dede is also the coordinator for the Hancock County Solid Waste Management District.

Jennifer Frye, deputy clerk-treasurer for the city of Greenfield.

Debbie Grass, a teacher at Eastern Hancock High School.

Summer Grinstead, an administrative assistant for the city of Greenfield.

Nicole Mann, practice manager at the Jane Pauley Community Health Center.

The new members replace five board members who are leaving: Edgar Moore, Libbie Day, Susan Davis, Alana Lashaway and Maribeth Vaughn.

The board of directors meets monthly and oversees the Leadership Hancock County program.

Enrollment opens for Class of 2017-18

People who want to nurture their leadership skills and build their leadership network can enroll in the 2017-18 class of Leadership Hancock County, which will convene this fall.

The class begins with a two-day team-building retreat on Sept. 14-15. It meets each month after that through March for an intensive study of leadership development that includes modules on local history, government, business, and key community issues. Two full class days are devoted to studying leadership styles and the importance of communication in effective leadership.

The deadline to enroll in this year’s class is Aug. 7. Class size is limited, so it’s important to enroll early. A link to the application and class calendar is below.

2017-18 Application LHC

Class of 2017 celebrates its accomplishments

Members of the Class of 2017 line up to receive their plaques on graduation night. The event was held at the NineStar Connect conference center in Greenfield

Members of the Class of 2017 line up to receive their plaques on graduation night. The event was held at the NineStar Connect conference center in Greenfield.

The 25 members of the Class of 2016-17 graduated during a fun-filled celebration on May 3.

The ceremony and dinner capped eight months of study for the class, which began its studies last September and finished with its community project presentations before 125 friends, family members and other supporters.

Laurene Lonnemann, a marketing professional at Elanco Animal Health, won the Stacia Alyea Excellence in Leadership Award. The honor is determined by a vote of the class and goes to the class member who best exemplifies leadership qualities. It is named after a late member of the original class of 1996.

The class had been divided into six project teams. Here are the teams and a summary of their projects:

Team Alternatives: Rachel Cremeans, Aaron O’Connor, Summer Grinstead, Robert Harris and Rachel Dennis. The group organized and put on a 5K walk/run to raise awareness about sexual assault. The event raised more than $3,000 for Alternatives Inc., a nonprofit that advocates for victims of domestic violence.

Team Backpack: Jennifer McMillan, Debbie Grass, Jennifer Frye and Jennifer Stanley. The group developed an inventory control system for Backpacks for Hope, a nonprofit that provides backpacks filled with supplies for homeless people.

Team Landing: Mike Graf, Nicole Mann, Mike Schull and Monica Sexton. The group developed a website for The Landing Place, an organization that works to help young people battling addiction. The web site launched the week after graduation.

Team Library: Lisa Thompson, Rob Caird, Marie Felver and Susie Coleman. The group created a sustainability plan for Little Free Libraries around Hancock County. The book kiosks are being placed in prominent spots such as parks and places where people congregate. One of them even has a geo cache for those who like to hunt down tagged locations.

Team Mural: Laurene Lonnemann, Cindi Holloway, Regina Jackson and Dede Allender. The group assembled a list of artists and researched the history of buildings that have been identified as potential sites for building murals in the Greenfield historic district. The histories will be used to inform the theme of the artwork on the buildings.

Team Garden: Kate Brown, Matt Davis, Teresa Smith and Kimberly Sombke: Working with a $1,300 grant from Home Depot, the group built a “sensory garden” in the courtyard at J.B. Stephens Elementary School in Greenfield.

 

Robert Harris (right) tells the audience about Team Alternatives' successful fundraiser April 8. Other members of the team were (from left) Summer Grinstead, Aaron O'Connor, Rachel Dennis and Rachel Cremeans

Robert Harris (right) tells the audience about Team Alternatives’ successful fundraiser, which was held April 8. Other members of the team were (from left) Summer Grinstead, Aaron O’Connor, Rachel Dennis and Rachel Cremeans

Debbie Grass and Jennifer Frye, members of Team Backpack, present packages of supplies to the organizers of Backpacks of Home, Cathy Matthews (back to the camera) and Jim Matthews (seated in foreground).

Debbie Grass and Jennifer Frye, members of Team Backpack, present packages of supplies to the organizers of Backpacks of Home, Cathy Matthews (back to the camera) and Jim Matthews (seated in foreground).

Members of Team Landing (from left), Mike Schull, Mike Graf, Nicole Mann and Monica Sexton, discuss building a new website for The Landing Place.

Members of Team Landing (from left), Mike Schull, Mike Graf, Nicole Mann and Monica Sexton, discuss building a new website for The Landing Place.

Some class members offered some dramatic flair for their presentations. One group brought Fatheads. Team Mural, on the other hand, donned artist costumes to present their work on adding murals to buildings in Greenfield. Team members were (from left) Laurene Lonnemann, Cindi Holloway and Regina Jackson. The fourth team member, Dede Allender is not visible in this photo.

Some class members offered some dramatic flair for their presentations. One group brought Fatheads. Team Mural, on the other hand, donned artist costumes to present their work on adding murals to buildings in Greenfield. Team members were (from left) Laurene Lonnemann, Cindi Holloway and Regina Jackson. The fourth team member, Dede Allender is not visible in this photo.

Team Library members Rob Caird (left), Marie Felver, Lisa Thompson and Susie Coleman read from a children's book during their presentation on Little Free Libraries.

Team Library members Rob Caird (left), Marie Felver, Lisa Thompson and Susie Coleman read from a children’s book during their presentation on Little Free Libraries.

Team Garden members (from left) Matt Davis, Kimberly Sombke, Kate Brown and Teresa Smith discuss the outpouring of financial and volunteer support for their project, a "sensory garden" at J.B. Stephens Elementary School

Team Garden members (from left) Matt Davis, Kimberly Sombke, Kate Brown and Teresa Smith discuss the outpouring of financial and volunteer support for their project, a “sensory garden” at J.B. Stephens Elementary School.